Depressed Latino elderly adults' decision-making and information seeking preferences in primary care: Implications for patient-centered care

Sara A Romero, Fordham University

Abstract

The shared decision-making (SDM) model is the primary patient-centered approach to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities in primary care settings. Key factors of SDM, decision-making process and the desire to be knowledgeable of health-related information, has not been extensively explored to determine within-group differences in Latino older adults. This current study examines a multiethnic group of depressed elderly Latino primary care patients to determine whether specific sociocultural demographic factors influence patients’ preferences in the decision-making process and their desire to be knowledgeable of health-related information. More specifically, differences between Puerto Rican elderly patients and patients of other Latino heritages were examined to identify culture-specific determinants. A sample of 184 Latino patients who completed measures of decision-making preferences, information-seeking desires, depression severity, level of disability, and social service needs were examined. Results indicated level of income and disability were culture-specific determinants for decision-making preferences and information-seeking desires for Latino older adults. Regression models indicated Latino heritage moderated the relationship between depression severity and decision-making preferences related to depression treatment and general medical decisions. Specifically, Puerto Ricans with high levels of depression preferred to be more autonomous in making decisions related to general medical conditions compared to other Latinos. Puerto Ricans and other Latinos with depression preferred to share problem-solving responsibilities with healthcare providers at lower levels of depression. However, Puerto Ricans with low depression treatment preferred to be less autonomous in making decisions related to depression treatment compared to other Latinos. At higher levels of depression both groups preferred to share problem-solving responsibilities with healthcare providers. This investigation adds to the literature by examining sociocultural characteristics that influence decision-making preferences and desires to be informed of health-related information for Latino older adults. Future research is needed to examine differences between Latino heritage groups to improve participation in decision-making in primary care settings.^

Subject Area

Gerontology|Medicine|Clinical psychology

Recommended Citation

Romero, Sara A, "Depressed Latino elderly adults' decision-making and information seeking preferences in primary care: Implications for patient-centered care" (2016). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI10016480.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI10016480

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