Examining the relationship between problem solving style and conventional, social, and enterprising career types

Marc Philip Steinmetz, Fordham University

Abstract

For the last century, much of the research on career development has focused on matching people with unique attributes to suitable careers. The most impressive of the person-career match theories is Holland’s career typology. This study analyzed the relationship between three of Holland’s career types and Problem Solving Style as measured by VIEW: An Assessment of Problem Solving Style. Four hundred and fifty adults over the age of 25 were randomly sampled from VIEW’s master database. The sample consisted of subjects that claimed to work in fields of Conventional, Social, and Enterprising types via John Holland’s theory. VIEW yielded information about six individual Problem Solving Styles along three dimensions: Orientation to Change (Explorer vs. Developer), Manner of Processing (External vs. Internal), and Ways of Deciding (People-oriented vs. Task-oriented). Findings reveal that people in Conventional type of careers were most likely to have Developer and Task-focused Problem Solving Styles. People in Enterprising careers were most likely to have an External Problem Solving Style. People in Social types of careers were most likely to be Person-focused in style. These findings enhance the career development and career choice field by helping people make more informed decisions as to appropriate careers based on their unique selves. ^

Subject Area

Counseling Psychology

Recommended Citation

Steinmetz, Marc Philip, "Examining the relationship between problem solving style and conventional, social, and enterprising career types" (2017). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI10257593.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI10257593

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