Attitudes about seeking professional psychological help, self-efficacy, and locus of control among individuals with a dual diagnosis

Lesley Schwartz Malin, Fordham University

Abstract

The constructs of self-efficacy, locus of control, and help seeking appear to have demonstrated value in exploring successful change among those diagnosed with an addictive disorder. Individuals with a co-occurring psychiatric disorder have been excluded from the previous research samples. This study explored self-efficacy and locus of control as they each related to attitudes about seeking professional psychological help in a dually diagnosed inpatient population. Demographic variables and rated participation in treatment groups were also compared to these psychological variables. ^ The participants were 80 inpatients with a dual diagnosis who were recent admissions on an acute care inpatient ward. Participants were asked to fill out four paper and pencil measures: The Attitudes Toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help Brief Version (Fisher & Farina, 1995), The Rotter Internal-External Locus of Control Scale (Rotter, 1966), The Drinking Related Locus of Control Scale (Keyson & Janda, unpublished), and The Drug Avoidance Self-Efficacy Scale (Martin, Wilkinson, & Poulos, 1995). ^ In general, participants in this study had positive attitudes about seeking professional psychological help, an internal orientation for locus of control of general life events, an internal orientation for their substance use behaviors, and high self-efficacy for remaining abstinent in alcohol and drug situations. ^ An external locus of control orientation for substance use was related to less positive attitudes about seeking professional psychological help. Locus of control for general life events, self-efficacy, and demographic variables were not significantly related to attitudes about seeking professional psychological help. ^ Additional analyses revealed that positive attitudes about seeking professional psychological help and internal locus of control for general life events both had relationships with better rated participation in treatment. External locus of control orientation for substance use behavior was related to the more days on the treatment ward at the time surveyed, and an external locus of control for general life events. High self-efficacy for avoidance of drug use related to an internal locus of control for general life events, internal locus of control for substance use, and fewer days on the ward at the time surveyed. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Lesley Schwartz Malin, "Attitudes about seeking professional psychological help, self-efficacy, and locus of control among individuals with a dual diagnosis" (January 1, 2002). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3045133.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3045133

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