Supervisee gender role identity and supervisory style and the supervisory relationship in school psychology

Jennifer Cari Epstein-D'Agate, Fordham University

Abstract

To date, little has been written concerning gender role identity within the context of supervision, particularly in school psychology. ^ School psychology interns (N = 114) completed a series of questionnaires to determine their gender role identity, perception of their supervisor's supervisory style, perception of their working alliance with their supervisor, overall satisfaction with supervision, and demographics. Participants were assigned to 1 of 4 groups (i.e., feminine, masculine, androgynous, or undifferentiated) according to their ratings on the Bem Sex-Role Inventory (BSRI). The undifferentiated category was not included in the data analyses as this category was of no theoretical relevance to this study. Comparisons were made between scores on the BSRI and Supervisory Styles Inventory (SSI) to determine whether a match was present for each supervisory dyad. ^ MANOVA failed to find differences among three gender role identity subgroups on a set of satisfaction measures. ^ Similarly, MANOVA failed to find differences between matched and unmatched dyads on the satisfaction measures. ^

Subject Area

Education, Educational Psychology|Psychology, Industrial

Recommended Citation

Jennifer Cari Epstein-D'Agate, "Supervisee gender role identity and supervisory style and the supervisory relationship in school psychology" (January 1, 2003). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3084909.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3084909

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