Mother's stress, life satisfaction, and child rearing practices, and children's temperament and social -emotional functioning

Nancee Santandren Pearl, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between various parent and child variables with social-emotional functioning of children. The specific parent variables were child rearing styles, parenting stress, and life satisfaction. The specific child variable was temperament. The participants were 142 mothers of first-grade students and the 22 teachers of the same first-grade students. Mothers completed ratings scales which served as the measures of their parenting styles, level of parenting stress, and level of life satisfaction. Teachers completed the Behavioral Symptoms Index of the Behavior Assessment System for Children which served as the measure of social-emotional functioning. A hierarchical multiple regression was conducted with all variables. Results indicated that all variables together adequately predicted social-emotional functioning. However, one attribute of temperament (i.e., impulsivity) and parenting stress level had the most significant effect on the social-emotional functioning of first grade students. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Social|Education, Early Childhood|Psychology, Developmental

Recommended Citation

Nancee Santandren Pearl, "Mother's stress, life satisfaction, and child rearing practices, and children's temperament and social -emotional functioning" (January 1, 2004). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3134448.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3134448

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