The effects of separation from parents, attachment to parents, triangulation in marital conflict, and parental social support on college adjustment

Melissa Ann Magnotti, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine how separation from parents, attachment to parents, triangulation of adolescents in marital conflict, and parental social support are related to college adjustment. One hundred and six undergraduate students completed self-report questionnaires that measured theses constructs. Results indicated that both separation from parents and a positive attachment to parents were related to a better college adjustment. While frequency of marital conflict was not related to college adjustment, triangulation of the adolescent in this conflict was related to a poorer college adjustment. Parental social support was directly related to college adjustment but did not buffer the effects of stress. These results indicate that it is important for psychologists working with college students to understand how the developmental task of adolescence and parental relationships interact with college adjustment. Students' struggles with academic, social, or personal concerns may be rooted in family dynamics and developmental struggles. Psychologists working with college students are likely to be more effective when armed with an understanding of the connections among these parts of an adolescent's experience. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Social|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Melissa Ann Magnotti, "The effects of separation from parents, attachment to parents, triangulation in marital conflict, and parental social support on college adjustment" (January 1, 2004). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3140900.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3140900

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