Mothers' use of drug prevention strategies with their children: Influence of personal, familial and environmental factors

Evelyn Castro, Fordham University

Abstract

This exploratory cross-sectional study proposed that mothers' use of substances, parent-child bonding, general self-efficacy, monitoring self-efficacy and/or their perceptions of their neighborhood would predict their parental monitoring. Parents have been found to be influential in preventing substance use among their children and parental monitoring has been found to be a strong protective factor in the prevention of substance use. Yet there is limited knowledge about the individual, familial and community factors which influence mothers to monitor their children in order to prevent their child's use of licit or illicit substances. An ecological framework guided this examination. Structured interviews were conducted with a sample of 113 mothers from a community based agency serving the South Bronx and East Harlem. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis found that increased monitoring was predicted by stronger parent-child bonding, increased general self-efficacy, younger age of child and having employment income. The findings of this study provide additional knowledge for the development of relevant drug prevention services geared to teaching parenting skills and suggest parenting topics which would support parents in becoming more active participants in the prevention of drug use by their own children. ^

Subject Area

Social Work|Health Sciences, Public Health|Sociology, Individual and Family Studies

Recommended Citation

Evelyn Castro, "Mothers' use of drug prevention strategies with their children: Influence of personal, familial and environmental factors" (January 1, 2005). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3199335.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3199335

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