Achievement goal theory and self -efficacy theory: Predicting the psychological effects of a New York Road Runners Foundation running program

Ariella Soffer, Fordham University

Abstract

This study investigated the utility of combining achievement goal and self-efficacy theories to gain a broader understanding of the psychological benefits of youth sport participation. The first purpose of this study was to examine the mediating effect of self-efficacy on the relationship between ego-orientation and self-esteem. The second aim was to examine the mediating effect of self-efficacy on the relationship between perceived ego-motivational climate and self-esteem. Thirdly, this study assessed the mediating effect of task-orientation on the relationship between perceived motivational climate and self-esteem. Participants were 56 male (n=23) and female (n=33) youth runners (M age=13.2). Participants completed questionnaires measuring task and ego orientation, perceived motivational climate, social self-efficacy, contingent self-worth, and self-esteem. Self-efficacy was found to mediate the relationship between perceived ego-motivational climate and self-esteem. Task-orientation mediated the relationship between perceived task-motivational climate and self-esteem. Findings support achievement goal theory, and confirm the value of considering the role of self-efficacy when examining the benefits of youth sport participation. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Developmental|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Ariella Soffer, "Achievement goal theory and self -efficacy theory: Predicting the psychological effects of a New York Road Runners Foundation running program" (January 1, 2008). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3337632.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3337632

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