Implicit associations in self -injurious behavior: An evaluation of the mechanisms involved in the affect -regulation model

Brittany F Ryan, Fordham University

Abstract

This study evaluated the self-punishment hypothesis and the distraction hypothesis of the affect regulation model of self-injurious behavior (SIB) using the R-COPE, the Implicit Association Test (IAT, Greenwald, McGhee, & Schwartz, 1998) and the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20, Bagby, Parker, & Taylor, 1994a). Data were collected from 62 undergraduate students, 33.9% of the sample engaged in SIB. Using the IAT, participants in both groups had positive self-concepts, which challenges the self-punishment hypothesis. IAT data did not support the distraction hypothesis. When a higher cut-off score for the SIB group was used, avoidant and self-punishment as coping strategies, as well as, alexithymia were endorsed at significantly higher rates in the SIB group. The IAT findings indicate that stable automatic associations do not underlie self-punishment and distraction. It is proposed that these mechanisms are more appropriately understood as being activated by negative affect. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Brittany F Ryan, "Implicit associations in self -injurious behavior: An evaluation of the mechanisms involved in the affect -regulation model" (January 1, 2008). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3353778.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3353778

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