An investigation of the relationships among performance anxiety, perfectionism, optimism, and self-efficacy in student performers

Christina Marie McQuade, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationships among performance anxiety, perfectionism, optimism, and self-efficacy. The sample included 139 undergraduate students who were studying one of the following performance arts: theater, acting, music, musical theater, dance, or speech arts. The majority of participants were matriculated students at a four-year college or university, while a smaller group was attending a postsecondary performing arts institution that specializes in musical theater. ^ All participants signed an informed consent form and completed a background questionnaire, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Life Orientation Test-Revised, and the General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale. Participants received all of these documents in person or in the mail. There was one principal researcher who administered and scored all of the questionnaires. ^ Correlational analyses revealed significant and negative relationships between performance anxiety and optimism, and performance anxiety and self-efficacy. The results of a standard multiple regression analysis indicated that perfectionism, optimism, and self-efficacy were predictive of performance anxiety. These findings highlight the importance of understanding how intrapersonal factors may be influencing students' experiences of performance anxiety. ^

Subject Area

Music|Theater|Education, Educational Psychology|Psychology, Personality

Recommended Citation

Christina Marie McQuade, "An investigation of the relationships among performance anxiety, perfectionism, optimism, and self-efficacy in student performers" (January 1, 2009). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3361368.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3361368

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