English language learners and reading disabilities: Reading ability profiles based on cognitive processing model and teacher perceptions

Staci Lynne Bloom, Fordham University

Abstract

This study investigated Spanish and English (a) underlying reading processes (i.e., working memory, phonemic awareness, executive functions, and cognitive fluency) based on a Cognitive Processing Model for identifying learning disabilities using the Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory; (b) reading performance; and (c) language proficiency of forty-five ELL students. Individual assessments in the previously mentioned areas were given to the students. Teachers' perceptions of whether the third grade students were at-risk for a reading disability were gathered through surveys. Pearson correlations, t-tests, and multiple regressions were computed on the assessment scores and teachers' perceptions' surveys. Results suggested that there are significant and positive correlations between some English and Spanish cognitive processes, reading performances, and language proficiencies. The findings also suggest significant differences in some areas based on teachers' perceptions, and Spanish working memory contributes to teachers' perceptions of whether a child is at risk for a reading disability. The findings from this study had important implications for enhancing assessment and intervention of children with reading disabilities. Future research should continue to examine the underlying cognitive processes as well as their contributions to teachers' perceptions of a child at risk for a reading disability. ^

Subject Area

Education, Elementary|Education, Educational Psychology|Education, Special|Education, Reading

Recommended Citation

Staci Lynne Bloom, "English language learners and reading disabilities: Reading ability profiles based on cognitive processing model and teacher perceptions" (January 1, 2008). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3361465.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3361465

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