Clinical efficacy of a game-based cognitive-behavioral therapy group program for children who have been sexually abused and maltreated

Justin R Misurell, Fordham University

Abstract

This study examined the efficacy of a game-based cognitive-behavioral (GB-CBT) group therapy program for children who have been sexually abused. Specifically, this studied examined the efficacy of GB-CBT for addressing a number of behavioral problems associated with children who have been sexually abused including internalizing symptoms (e.g., anxiety, depression, and trauma), externalizing behaviors (e.g., oppositional behavior, disobedience, and conduct disordered behavior), total behavioral problems, sexually inappropriate behaviors; social skills deficits, and poor self perception. Utility of GB-CBT for providing psychoeducation on child abuse and self protection skills was also assessed. Results indicated that the GB-CBT program was effective in improving internalizing, externalizing, and total behavior problems for children in the study between the ages of six and ten, reducing sexually inappropriate behaviors and successfully improved children's knowledge of abuse and self-protection skills. Although results were positive for social skills and self perception measures, these findings were not statistically significant. Clinical significance testing results are also presented. Alternative explanations for the findings are provided, followed by a discussion of the study's limitations. Future areas of research are also suggested. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Justin R Misurell, "Clinical efficacy of a game-based cognitive-behavioral therapy group program for children who have been sexually abused and maltreated" (January 1, 2010). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3438472.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3438472

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