Learning to Cope with Stress through Art: An evaluation of a school-based creative arts primary prevention program for children in elementary school

Jody Wurzel, Fordham University

Abstract

This study examines the effects of the CARING at Columbia program, a school-based creative arts primary prevention program at a New York City public elementary school. It aims to answer whether the program is effective in improving affect, problem solving skills, the ability to seek social support, and self-esteem. It also examined whether it is effective in decreasing negative coping skills of distancing, internalizing, and externalizing. ^ Twenty-nine children, ages 9–12, participated in the study from October 2007 to February 2008. The experimental and usual care groups, completed The Self-Report Coping Measure (Causey & Dubow, 1992) and the Multidimensional Self-Concept Scale (Bracken, 1992) at pre- and posttest to determine the impact of the program. ^ Despite non-significant findings, the study suggests that the program is helpful in identifying potential risks for children. Design limitations such as the inability to fully randomize the sample may have played a role in the study's outcome. ^

Subject Area

Social Work|Education, Educational Psychology|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Jody Wurzel, "Learning to Cope with Stress through Art: An evaluation of a school-based creative arts primary prevention program for children in elementary school" (January 1, 2011). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3458137.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3458137

Share

COinS