Mindfulness and perfectionism as predictors of physical and psychological well-being in college students

Claudia Mariana Perolini, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine whether perfectionism and Eastern and Western views of mindfulness predicted psychological well-being and physical health in college students. This study also examined the relationship between mindfulness and perfectionism. The sample consisted of 335 college students aged 29 or younger. More than half of the participants completed the measures online in exchange for course-credit. The rest of the participants completed the measures in person and did not receive course credit for their participation. All participants provided informed consent prior to starting the survey. The survey included a demographic questionnaire, the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale, the Langer Mindfulness Scale, the Almost Perfect Scale—Revised, the Physical Health Questionnaire, and the Scales of Psychological Well-Being. ^ Statistical analyses indicated positive correlations between Eastern and Western mindfulness and perceived health, and between Eastern and Western mindfulness and psychological well-being. Perfectionism was negatively correlated with perceived health and psychological well-being. In addition, the maladaptive aspects of perfectionism were negatively correlated with Eastern and Western mindfulness. In contrast, adaptive perfectionism was positively correlated with Eastern and Western mindfulness. Standard multiple regression analyses indicated that Eastern mindfulness, Western mindfulness, and perfectionism accounted for significant variation in physical health and psychological well-being. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that Eastern mindfulness and maladaptive perfectionism interacted in their effects on both physical health and psychological well-being. Adaptive perfectionism and Western mindfulness were also found to interact in their effects on psychological well-being. Taken together, these findings underscore the relationship between these personality variables and individuals’ well-being and stress the importance of future research to continue to elucidate the multifaceted interrelationships between mindfulness, perfectionism, and well-being.^

Subject Area

Education, Educational Psychology|Psychology, Cognitive|Education, Higher

Recommended Citation

Perolini, Claudia Mariana, "Mindfulness and perfectionism as predictors of physical and psychological well-being in college students" (2012). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3461892.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3461892

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