Education's anomaly: Voices of African-American principals in predominantly white schools

Kevin Jayson Holloway, Fordham University

Abstract

This national study explores and examines the experiences of African American principals in predominantly White schools. The purpose of the study is to explore and understand the impact of race on the experiences of African American principals in predominantly White schools and how African American principals make sense of their experiences. ^ The study employed a qualitative research design to address four research questions. A purposeful sampling was used to identify 14 participants for the study. To find participants matching the criteria for the study a pre-selection survey was sent to possible candidates via email or U.S. postal mail. The participants represent four geographic regions of the United States: North, South, Midwest, and West. The participants are both male and female and represent three academic levels: elementary, middle, and high school. ^ The findings suggest that race shapes the experiences of African American principals in predominantly White schools. Additionally, race plays a critical role in how African American principals make sense of their experiences as leaders in predominantly White schools. ^ The study identified three major themes and several secondary themes. From the themes uncovered, the study concluded with an interpretation of the findings and recommendations for future research, as well as for the academic community at large.^

Subject Area

African American Studies|Education, Leadership|Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

Kevin Jayson Holloway, "Education's anomaly: Voices of African-American principals in predominantly white schools" (January 1, 2012). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3493585.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3493585

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