The effect of connectedness in adolescence on active citizenship in adulthood: A longitudinal study

James W Lauckhardt, Fordham University

Abstract

This study tested the impact of feelings of connectedness to family, school, and community in adolescence on active citizenship in adulthood. Path analysis was used to test the hypothesized relationships. Four time points of data collected from 9,421 participants in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) were analyzed. The Add Health study is a Nationally representative survey of emotional, physical, and social attitudes and behaviors from adolescence through adulthood. Participants were enrolled in the study in 1994, and interviewed 4 times from 1994–2008. The current study showed empirical support for the stability of connectedness to family, school, and community, respectively, over one year. The hypothesized relationship between connectedness and civic action over time was not empirically supported. Gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status did not significantly impact the relationship between connectedness and active citizenship. Possible explanations for these findings are presented and suggestions for future research are discussed.^

Subject Area

Psychology, Developmental|Psychology, General

Recommended Citation

James W Lauckhardt, "The effect of connectedness in adolescence on active citizenship in adulthood: A longitudinal study" (January 1, 2012). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3512281.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3512281

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