New assistant principals: Union-sponsored professional development's effects on their satisfaction, efficacy, and aspirations

Natalia Alexandra Garcia, Fordham University

Abstract

This quantitative study investigated the effects of a union-sponsored professional development program, the Council of School Supervisors and Administrators' School-Based Intermediate Supervisors Institute (SBISI), on new assistant principals who attended it in 2010–2011. The New Assistant Principal's Satisfaction, Efficacy, and Aspirations©, an original survey instrument, measured the respondents' job satisfaction, self-efficacy, career aspirations, work conditions, role involvement, as well as relationships with the principals, teachers, and community. Demographic, professional, and school district profiles data were also collected. All assistant principals from the SBISI 2010-2011 cohort were invited to participate. The demographic data suggest that the majority of the new assistant principal program participants are female, from elementary schools, and had classroom teaching experience ranging from 6 to 10 years. The majority hold a Master's degree, only 5% have a Ph.D. Their ages range was 30–39 years, race was split evenly between Blacks and Whites. Almost all participants received their administrative credentials via a traditional route. Although two-thirds of the assistant principals were highly satisfied with their positions, only 41% aspire to move into the principalship. The older cohort (40 and over) aspired to it less than did those under 40, but indicated a stronger sense of job satisfaction than did their younger counterparts. Those under 40 reported high levels of self-efficacy and a greater desire to move into the principalship. The results of the study indicate that a School-Based Intermediate Supervisors Institute be made a mandatory requirement for all newly appointed assistant principals. ^

Subject Area

Education, Leadership

Recommended Citation

Natalia Alexandra Garcia, "New assistant principals: Union-sponsored professional development's effects on their satisfaction, efficacy, and aspirations" (January 1, 2012). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3517893.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3517893

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