Relationships between attachment and psychological well-being in Hispanic American and non-Hispanic White college students

Daphne Stuart McCampbell, Fordham University

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between parental attachment, adult attachment, and psychological well-being among Hispanic American and non-Hispanic White college students. There were 166 participants, 84 of whom were Hispanic American (50.6%), and 82 of whom were non-Hispanic White (49.4%). In terms of parental attachment, results indicated higher maternal and paternal attachment among non-Hispanic White college students than Hispanic American college students. Concerning parental and adult attachment, results indicated ethnicity moderated the impact of paternal attachment on adult-attachment related anxiety. Also, it was the unique contribution of attachment to one's father, or paternal attachment, as opposed to parental attachment, that was a significant predictor of adult attachment relationships. In terms of psychological well-being, results indicated maternal attachment, as well as adult attachment-related anxiety, as significant predictors of each of Ryff's psychological well-being scale across ethnicities, except for autonomy. This study's findings suggest ethnic differences in the relationship between paternal attachment and adult attachment-related anxiety, as well as among the subscales of Ryff's scale. Limitations and clinical and research implications of this study are discussed.^

Subject Area

Psychology, Counseling

Recommended Citation

Daphne Stuart McCampbell, "Relationships between attachment and psychological well-being in Hispanic American and non-Hispanic White college students" (January 1, 2012). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI3518869.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3518869

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