The protective role of individual, familial, and peer factors on the association between chronic cumulative community strain and delinquency in African-American adolescent males

Azizi A Seixas, Fordham University

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between chronic cumulative community strain (CCCS), such as exposure to violence and poverty, and delinquency, in a sample of 74 African American adolescent boys. In addition, the moderational effects of positive coping, family cohesion, authoritarian parenting styles, prosocial involvement and male identity on the relationship between CCCS and delinquency were examined. Results demonstrate the significant main effect associations between exposure to violence and delinquency and SES and delinquency provide support for chronic cumulative community strain being associated with delinquency. In addition, negative coping and family conflict were related to delinquency, but the relationship was not significant after controlling for their relationship to exposure to violence. The current study also showed that a reference group nondependent (RGND) male identity moderated the positive relationship between violence victimization and delinquent behavior. In addition, the study showed that the no reference group identity had a buffering effect in which African American boys who have low levels of this identity status and have experienced being a victim of violence are less likely to be involved in delinquent behavior. Positive coping, family cohesion, authoritarian parenting styles, and prosocial involvement did not significantly moderate the relationship between CCCS and delinquency.^

Subject Area

African American Studies|Psychology, Clinical|Sociology, Criminology and Penology

Recommended Citation

Seixas, Azizi A, "The protective role of individual, familial, and peer factors on the association between chronic cumulative community strain and delinquency in African-American adolescent males" (2011). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3542754.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3542754

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