Effects of Distal Minority Stress on Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Psychological Health and Context

Derek Brian Brown, Fordham University

Abstract

Depression and anxiety are prevalent psychological health problems that are disproportionately represented in lesbians, gay men and bisexuals when compared to heterosexuals. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between psychological health and its determinants using the National Survey of Midlife in the United States II (Ryff, et al., 2004–2006), a cross-sectional investigation of adult health and well-being, and its 108 lesbian, gay and bisexual subsample. A conceptual model is advanced to explain these psychological health disparities and their relationship to the determinants of minority stress, health risk behaviors and social support. Results indicated that distal minority stress was correlated with depressive symptomatology, health risk behaviors and social support. Path analysis was conducted, and the conceptual model was not supported. The revised model showed that distal minority stress had a direct effect on depression, health risk behaviors and social support. Research, policy and practice implications are discussed.^

Subject Area

Health Sciences, Mental Health|Social Work|GLBT Studies

Recommended Citation

Brown, Derek Brian, "Effects of Distal Minority Stress on Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Psychological Health and Context" (2012). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3544981.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3544981

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