Diabetes treatment adherence: Role of working alliance, locus of control, and social-cognitive factors

Jessie Anne Fontanella, Fordham University

Abstract

Poorly managed type 2 diabetes is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but most patients do not adhere to all aspects of treatment which typically includes taking medication and making lifestyle modifications. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a patient's relationship with his or her physician moderated the effects of select variables, including outcome expectations, self-efficacy, and health locus of control beliefs, on type 2 diabetes treatment adherence. A convenience sample of 141 participants completed an anonymous online survey. Both self-efficacy beliefs and outcome expectations were found to be positive predictors of type 2 diabetes treatment adherence. Alternatively, an individual's belief in their ability to influence health outcomes was inversely related to type 2 diabetes treatment adherence. The quality of the physician-patient relationship was predicted by self-efficacy and an individual's belief in the ability of the healthcare provider to influence health outcomes. The results did not support the hypothesized model in which the physician-patient relationship would serve as a moderator variable. These findings are discussed in the context of clinical implications and areas for future research.^

Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Fontanella, Jessie Anne, "Diabetes treatment adherence: Role of working alliance, locus of control, and social-cognitive factors" (2013). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3558158.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3558158

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