Mindfulness, role balance, behavioral engagement, and success among college transfer students

Adam Joncich, Fordham University

Abstract

This study was designed to investigate the effects of psychological and behavioral academic engagement variables, on student academic success among urban transfer students. Structural equation modeling was applied to a preexisting dataset composed of survey data measuring mindfulness, role balance, and academic engagement, as well as outcome data in the form of first semester grade point average. Hypotheses were derived from literature suggesting mindfulness would be positively associated with role ease, academic engagement and academic success, and negatively associated with role strain; role ease would be positively associated with academic success, role strain would be negatively associated with academic success, and academic engagement would be positively associated with academic success. In line with hypotheses, results indicated that mindfulness was significantly associated with student success, role balance, and academic engagement. However, neither role strain, nor role ease, nor academic engagement demonstrated significant associations with transfer student success. These results are discussed in the context of implications for transfer student programming, with a focus on possible applications to mindfulness training through meditative exercise.^

Subject Area

Education, Educational Psychology|Education, Higher

Recommended Citation

Joncich, Adam, "Mindfulness, role balance, behavioral engagement, and success among college transfer students" (2013). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3564153.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3564153

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