The Salvation Army corps officer: A territorial survey of vocational preparation, role, efficacy, and ministry satisfaction

Mark Wesley Tillsley, Fordham University

Abstract

Officers of the Salvation Army (SA or Army) are Protestant clergy, ordained ministers of the Salvation Army denomination who function in a broad range of leadership roles. Operations of the SA are supervised by trained, commissioned officers. Officers proclaim the gospel and serve as pastors, administrators, teachers, social workers, counselors, youth leaders, and musicians. SA corps officership is a ministry call to care for the lost, marginalized, exploited, and neglected in society. Congregants and the larger community might have divergent expectations and define ministry effectiveness differently. Like other evangelical clergy, the SA officer is called to be biblically faithful and culturally relevant. This study focused specific attention on SA corps officers in the USA Eastern Territory. This quantitative study examined corps officers' perceptions of training and preparation, support by supervising officers, ministry roles, and leadership styles relative to corps officer satisfaction, efficacy, aspirations, and longevity. More than half (420) of the 728 SA corps officers in the USA Eastern Territory completed the SAVED survey instrument. Results indicate corps officers' perceptions of administrative support, administrative competency, and adequate training, and preparation all correlate significantly with satisfaction and efficacy. Based on these findings, the greatest predictor of corps officers' satisfaction and sense of efficacy is the corps officers' perception of administrative support from the divisional leadership.^

Subject Area

Religion, General|Education, Leadership|Education, Religious

Recommended Citation

Tillsley, Mark Wesley, "The Salvation Army corps officer: A territorial survey of vocational preparation, role, efficacy, and ministry satisfaction" (2013). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3590924.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3590924

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