Creativity and conversion in Gordon D. Kaufman's theology: Detraditionalization, identity and responsibility in an age of crisis

Nathanael L Inglis, Fordham University

Abstract

This dissertation proposes that the theology of Gordon D. Kaufman offers a promising direction for Christian theology in light of the challenges posed by detraditionalization and humanity's crisis of power. By separating the identification of moral norms from the authority of tradition, Kaufman offers a promising third way for theology, between assent to external authority and capitulation to individual authority. Kaufman theology is also particularly relevant to addressing humanity's crisis of power, since it shifts the theological understanding of the balance of power between humanity, the world, and God in a way that can empower Christians to take greater initiative as agents of moral transformation. Arguing that this type of theology is analogous in some important respects to the use of tradition by the classical biblical prophets, this dissertation concludes that Kaufman's theology is a call for conversion to christomorphic humanization, and is a compelling option for contemporary Christian theology.^

Subject Area

Theology

Recommended Citation

Inglis, Nathanael L, "Creativity and conversion in Gordon D. Kaufman's theology: Detraditionalization, identity and responsibility in an age of crisis" (2014). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3611866.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3611866

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