An exploration of multimedia reading instruction and its impact on students' online/offline reading comprehension

Jade A Morano, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore whether teaching online reading skills within small-group intervention affects the reading comprehension of low-proficient fifth-grade readers in digital media and printed text. Although technology use in the classroom may be increasing, significant research is lacking to guide educators who are preparing students to become proficient in the new literacies of the 21st century. Using a multiple case study approach, students were instructed in reading comprehension strategies geared for reading digital, online informational text. The study examined how instruction in computer skills and multimedia informational text comprehension affected students' reading comprehension in digital media and printed text during and after instruction. As students' think-aloud protocols with print and multimedia text were investigated, patterns of reading comprehension strategies and their interactions with the digital media were also identified and examined. Results from this study revealed that students' reading comprehension strategies, computer skills, and motivation to read digital text improved when reading multimedia texts after instruction in computer skills and strategies. Findings indicated that low-proficient readers applied reading comprehension strategies and performed more successfully on print texts after instruction in informational text. Recommendations for more effective use of technology within the classrooms were made based on the analysis.^

Subject Area

Education, Elementary

Recommended Citation

Morano, Jade A, "An exploration of multimedia reading instruction and its impact on students' online/offline reading comprehension" (2014). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3629255.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3629255

Share

COinS