Academic Achievement among Latina Undergraduates: An Examination of Psychosociocultural Factors Associated with Academic Achievement and Persistence among Dominican and Puerto Rican Students

Michell Tollinchi, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to examine the psychosociocultural factors (cultural congruence, ethnic identity, acculturation, mentoring support, and family support) on the academic persistence of Latina undergraduate students, with a preliminary observation on Dominican and Puerto Rican students. The sample of 257 Latina undergraduate students were drawn from a list of northeastern colleges/universities identified through the researcher's membership in professional consortia. Students completed an on-line survey which consisted of previously validated scales that measured the psychosociocultural variables and persistence. Cultural congruity (r=0.329, p=0.01), ethnic identity (r=0.345, p =0.01), perceived family support (r=0.345, p=0.00), and mentoring support (r=0.487, p=0.00) were all positively correlated to academic persistence; while acculturation (r=-.131, p=.046) was negatively correlated with persistence. Further analysis determined that for Dominicans (n=73) increased persistence was positively correlated with ethnic identity (r=.392, p=.001), mentoring scale (r=.486, p=.000), and cultural congruity (r=.304, p=.016). Puerto Rican (n=27) students who have increased scores in persistence were more likely to score higher on the perceived social support scale (r=.628, p=.000) only. It is evident that there are many factors that support student's persistence in college. Effectively supporting students individually and by providing resources at the college level can help increase the rates of graduation.^

Subject Area

Higher education administration|Latin American studies

Recommended Citation

Tollinchi, Michell, "Academic Achievement among Latina Undergraduates: An Examination of Psychosociocultural Factors Associated with Academic Achievement and Persistence among Dominican and Puerto Rican Students" (2015). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3684632.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3684632

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