Examining the role of classroom environment on peer comparisons and academic outcomes among preadolescents

Kristin Marie Tortorici, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine how aspects of the middle school environment, specifically classroom climate, impact students’ engagement in social comparisons with peers and achievement goal adoption, and the implication that such relationships have for academic self-efficacy and achievement in math. Participants (N = 121) completed several scales adapted from the Classroom Life Measure and the Patterns of Academic Learning Scales (PALS) associated with classroom climate, achievement goal adoption, and academic self-efficacy. They also completed the Iowa-Netherlands Comparison Orientation Measure (INCOM). Students’ math grade point average was also obtained. Correlational and regression analyses were conducted to analyze the data. Results indicated that a positive classroom climate did not significantly impact the variance in students’ achievement as predicted. Further, contrary to expectations, students’ social comparison orientation was found to have a strong positive relationship with GPA. Findings indicated that mastery goal adoption was a significant positive predictor of achievement, but performance-approach goal adoption was a significant negative predictor of achievement. Study results warrant further investigation of students’ engagement in social comparisons and its role in the academic environment to obtain a better understanding of the intricate roles that social relationships play with respect to academic outcomes.^

Subject Area

Middle school education|Social psychology|Developmental psychology

Recommended Citation

Tortorici, Kristin Marie, "Examining the role of classroom environment on peer comparisons and academic outcomes among preadolescents" (2015). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3714272.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3714272

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