Developmental differences in attributions and self-worth among students with and without learning disabilities

Jaime Lyn Rice, Fordham University

Abstract

This study examined developmental and disability status differences in third- and sixth-grade students’ academic self-concept and the causal attributions for their success and failure on puzzle tasks under conditions of standard and extended time. The students, half of whom were those with specific learning disabilities, completed self-report measures of their competencies across several domains (e.g., behavior, academics, social skills). They then completed a puzzle task under standard and extended time conditions and indicated their attributions for success and failure on the task. Overall, neither academic self-concept nor disability status were associated with students’ attributions to ability for a task, effort expended, difficulty of the task, luck in receiving a task they could complete, or time available to complete the task, regardless of whether the students succeeded or failed at the task. Grade level differences were, however, found for the ability, effort, and task difficulty attributions when extended time was provided.^

Subject Area

Social psychology|Elementary education|Special education|Personality psychology|Cognitive psychology

Recommended Citation

Rice, Jaime Lyn, "Developmental differences in attributions and self-worth among students with and without learning disabilities" (2015). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3722234.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3722234

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