JOB CHOICE AND JOB SATISFACTION AMONG GRADUATES OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAMS IN NEW YORK CITY: 1966-1976

LEONARD DAVIDMAN, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the factors influencing the job choices and job satisfaction of graduates of school psychology programs. Two survey instruments--the School Psychology Graduate Questionnaire and the Brayfield and Rothe Index of Job Satisfaction--were used to gather information from graduates who earned degrees from 1966 through 1976 from nine school psychology programs in metropolitan New York City. Of the 1,181 questionnaires delivered, 803 (70%) completed questionnaires were returned. The proportion of doctorates to nondoctorates was 40% to 60%.^ The results show a trend among nondoctoral graduates to be employed as school psychologists, and after earning the doctorate, eventually to leave the specialty. About two-thirds were not working in the school at the time of the survey, and one-third never worked as a school psychologist. One-quarter of the doctoral graduates and less than half of the nondoctoral graduates currently work as school psychologists. Almost one-third of all respondents work in clinical settings mainly with children and adolescents. Six percent work in academic positions and 5.5% practice psychotherapy independently. With regard to ideal preference for training after completing the BA, a similar percentage of respondents preferred either school or clinical psychology training. For those interested in clinical training, the interest persisted with a small percentage switching to doctoral clinical programs.^ The data show that the factors of (a) orientation of training program, (b) setting of internship served, (c) degree level, (d) sex, and (e) original motivation for entering the specialty were relevant in determining whether or not a graduate became a school based psychologist. Job satisfaction was positive for those remaining as school psychologists. However, some respondents that left cited dissatisfaction with the field as one reason for leaving.^ Recommendations were made to increase the percentage of graduates that remain in the schools, such as stressing school based experience for trainers and interns alike, screening out clinically oriented students, broadening the function of school psychologists in the schools, and providing career information to undergraduate psychology majors. ^

Subject Area

Educational psychology

Recommended Citation

DAVIDMAN, LEONARD, "JOB CHOICE AND JOB SATISFACTION AMONG GRADUATES OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAMS IN NEW YORK CITY: 1966-1976" (1982). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8213600.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8213600

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