STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AS RELATED TO THE TRAINING AND BACKGROUND OF THE SUPERVISOR

STEPHEN DAVID WARD, Fordham University

Abstract

The major purpose of this study was to investigate student reading achievement as it was related to the training and background of the reading supervisor. The study sought to determine if a reading supervisor's area of specialization, degree of preparation, and experience as a reading teacher were related to student reading achievement for the years 1978, 1979, and 1980.^ This study also sought to determine if the reading teachers' perception of their supervisor's expertise in the area of reading was related to student reading achievement for the same three-year period.^ The sample consisted of 31 reading supervisors and the reading teachers from predominantly Black Title I junior high schools in New York City. The supervisors were asked questions concerning their training and background.^ The teachers' perception of their supervisor's expertise in reading was measured by an instrument constructed by McNinch and Richmond (1977). Through a correlational approach, these data were then analyzed in relation to the reading scores of each school for the three-year period.^ The assumption was made that there was a direct relationship between each independent variable and the dependent variable, student reading achievement.^ The results of this study supported the following conclusions: (1) For students in grades seven, eight, and nine, it did make a difference in student reading achievement whether or not a supervisor was eligible for certification in the area of reading. (2) For students in grades seven, eight, and nine, it did not make a difference in student reading achievement if a reading supervisor had ever taught reading. (3) The more credits a junior high school reading supervisor obtained in reading made a difference in student reading achievement. (4) As students progressed from the seventh to the ninth grade in a particular junior high school, the reading teachers' perception of their supervisor's expertise in reading affected student reading achievement. (5) A supervisor's area of specialization and the number of credits that he had obtained in reading were the most statistically significant variables among those studied in relation to student reading achievement. ^

Subject Area

Educational administration

Recommended Citation

WARD, STEPHEN DAVID, "STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AS RELATED TO THE TRAINING AND BACKGROUND OF THE SUPERVISOR" (1982). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8213626.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8213626

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