IMPACT OF SELF-MODELING OR PEER MODELING ON CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR OF INATTENTIVE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BOYS

AGNES E. FLYNN MURRAY, Fordham University

Abstract

This study examined the differential effects of self-modeling and peer modeling by means of edited videotapes on the on-task classroom behavior of nine fifth/sixth grade boys rated by their teacher as consistently inattentive. Subjects were randomly assigned to the self-modeling, the peer-modeling, or the contact control group. Two different videotapes were made for viewing by each subject and were presented on a rotating basis to prevent boredom. Subjects viewed videotapes individually three times weekly before first lesson in the morning. The dependent variable was the proportion of time on-task during the students' first lesson (social studies). A 10-second time sampling measurement procedure was used in which trained observers coded a target child's behavior as on- or off-task every 10 seconds rotating among subjects. In a multiple baseline-reversal design a baseline level of behavior was determined (Phase I) followed by presentation of intervention (videotape viewing) (Phase II) three times weekly for 2 weeks followed by withdrawal of intervention with continuation of observations (Phase III) three times weekly for 1 week. Intervention was again presented over a 2-week period (Phase IV) followed by a second withdrawal of intervention with continuation of observations (Phase V) for 1 week. One week later follow-up observations (Phase VI) were made twice. Visual analysis of data indicated inconsistent findings. Although two subjects appeared to benefit from the self-modeling technique, for one the gains were small. For both students who showed positive results, gains were maintained at follow-up. Peer modeling appeared to have a slight effect on one student but gains were not maintained. The other two peer-modeling subjects showed gains at follow-up. Controls showed no measurable gains. In contrast to the visual analysis of individuals, statistical comparison of groups by analysis of variance of repeated measures indicated no significant differences resulting from the intervention. Possible differences in the two modeling techniques in terms of attention and reinforcement were discussed. It was noted that the two students making the greatest gains in their respective groups were those who had been labeled LD. ^

Subject Area

Psychology

Recommended Citation

MURRAY, AGNES E. FLYNN, "IMPACT OF SELF-MODELING OR PEER MODELING ON CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR OF INATTENTIVE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BOYS" (1982). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8223610.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8223610

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