IN TRANSITION: A STUDY OF WOMEN RELIGIOUS ADMINISTRATORS IN NONTRADITIONAL ROLES

JULIA ANN HESLIN, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of this exploratory/descriptive field study was to determine the administrative opportunities available to fifty women religious administrators. All of the participants in this study had been principals (74%), assistant principals (10%), or program administrators (16%) who changed from a traditional ministry (education) to a nontraditional ministry (chaplain or pastoral assistant). Since the research literature indicated that past education, family background, role models, and administrative (career) experience are significant variables in the study of women administrators, the interview questions and the Biographical Data Inventory centered on these variables. The answers to the inquiries--when and why the participant changed ministries, what the challenges were in gaining access and adapting to a new ministry--provided data on the administrative experience of these women.^ The major conclusions based on the findings of this research were: (1) The women religious administrators in this study were generally well educated--all had a bachelors degree and over 90 percent had a masters degree. Another 40 percent had additional professional training for a new ministry. (2) The support and influence of parents was evident in the interviews and the BDI. Over 50 percent of the participants were the oldest child or oldest girl in the family and 92 percent came from homes where both parents were present. 28 percent, spoke of their father's influence and support in their personal and professional lives. (3) The self-confidence and achievement orientation of these women was reinforced by role models outside the home, especially in the educational environment. The positive influence of their teachers was mentioned by 34 percent of the participants. 50 percent indicated the encouragement they received from principals while they were teaching. The guidance and direction of educational supervisors was stressed by 24 percent of the participants. (4) All of these women gained access to their first adminstrative assignment through teaching. Only 25 percent believed that a supervisor or principal recommended them for the principalship and 50 percent thought their organizational ability and rapport with people were factors in their selection. . . . (Author's abstract exceeds stipulated maximum length. Discontinued here with permission of author.) UMI ^

Subject Area

Educational administration

Recommended Citation

HESLIN, JULIA ANN, "IN TRANSITION: A STUDY OF WOMEN RELIGIOUS ADMINISTRATORS IN NONTRADITIONAL ROLES" (1983). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8308476.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8308476

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