PARAPROFESSIONALS' PERCEPTIONS OF THE CAREER LADDER, THEIR EDUCATIONAL TASKS AND CITIZEN PARTICIPATION IN NEW YORK CITY TITLE I SCHOOLS

JAMES ALAN KEREWSKI, Fordham University

Abstract

The major purposes of this study were to determine and compare the perceptions of paraprofessionals with respect to their use of the career ladder, their aspirations for more responsibility and the extent to which they realized those aspirations. This study also sought to determine the paraprofessionals' role in promoting a school-community link.^ The subjects were paraprofessionals (N = 230), supervising teachers (N = 92) and Presidents of Parent Advisory Councils (N = 25) in two Bronx County, New York school districts. Responses were analyzed in terms of frequency, distribution and one way analysis of variance.^ Conclusions. (partial) (1) Educational associates, the highest level of paraprofessional studied, used the career ladder more than other paraprofessionals but very few actually became teachers. (2) Most paraprofessionals felt their training and utilization were not fully recognized by the supervising teachers. (3) Paraprofessionals and supervising teachers did not view the paraprofessional role in the same manner. (4) Previous studies hypothesizing that the use of paraprofessionals would produce stronger school-community relations were not confirmed.^ Recommendations. (partial) (1) Paraprofessional training should be in specific curriculum areas such as science and math rather than elementary education. (2) Paraprofessional in-service training should be continued after the basic job requirements have been met. (3) Training should be provided for teachers to enable them to work more effectively with the paraprofessionals. ^

Subject Area

Educational administration

Recommended Citation

KEREWSKI, JAMES ALAN, "PARAPROFESSIONALS' PERCEPTIONS OF THE CAREER LADDER, THEIR EDUCATIONAL TASKS AND CITIZEN PARTICIPATION IN NEW YORK CITY TITLE I SCHOOLS" (1983). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8308477.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8308477

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