A SCHOOL-BASED COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION PROGRAM FOR HYPERAGGRESSIVE CHILDREN

BRUCE KAHL, Fordham University

Abstract

The present research investigated the use of school-based personnel to teach self-control skills to hyperaggressive children. The principal issues investigated were whether there would be significant differences between the four study groups (Cognitive-Behavior Modification (CBM), Behavior Modification, Expanded Control, and Waiting List Control) in reducing aggression on Miller's School Behavior Checklist (SBCL); whether there would be a significant interaction between Group and Time Blocks (8 time blocks) on several observational measures: Verbal Aggression, Physical Aggression, Successful Coping, and Appropriate Behavior; and whether a unique combination of operant and CBM procedures was more effective than Behavior Modification in reducing aggression and sustaining training effects.^ The SBCL was completed by classroom teachers for all kindergarten, first, and second grade children in a socioeconomically depressed district of the New York City school system. Those children who scored two standard deviations or more above the mean on the Aggression scale of the SBCL were chosen for the study and randomly assigned to the four groups, each of which contained seventeen children. Two alternative forms of the SBCL were also subsequently completed by the classroom teachers. A set of observational measures, employed by the classroom paraprofessionals, were also used for purposes of data analysis.^ An ANOVA design was utilized to analyze group differences on the SBCL. A repeated measures, ANOVA design was employed on the observational measures. Graphic procedures were used to highlight interaction effects. In both cases, the CBM training proved the most effective in reducing aggression, increasing Appropriate Behavior, and sustaining training effects.^ The results offered good support for the effectiveness of a combined CBM intervention, carried out by school-based personnel. This finding is consistent with recent research indicating that the above combination is more powerful than any of its component parts. The powerful generalization effects are consistent with the latest literature on "Metacognitive Development," highlighting the same constituent processes.^ Future research should attempt to isolate the specific components of the CBM procedure, possibly leading to a more powerful strategy when other disorders or clinical populations are examined. Limitations were identified in terms of restricted generalizability, and a lack of teacher and parent involvement. ^

Subject Area

Educational psychology

Recommended Citation

KAHL, BRUCE, "A SCHOOL-BASED COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION PROGRAM FOR HYPERAGGRESSIVE CHILDREN" (1984). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8409259.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8409259

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