SCHOOL AND SOCIAL EFFECTS: ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT IN A SELECT STUDENT GROUP (GENDER, PERSONALITY, FAMILY/ETHNICITY)

ROSE CZARNIEWICZ ALLOCCA, Fordham University

Abstract

Using school records, questionnaires, interviews, and the Student Attitude Measure, the study explored the factors affecting academic achievement in a large, urban, technical high school. For 20 high-achieving and 20 low-achieving seniors, data were gathered on sex, ethnicity, personality factors, high school and college entrance test scores, grade point averages, areas of concentration, attendance, activities, study habits, school motivation, academic self-concept, self-perception of problems, successes, failures, and influences of peers, family, and school personnel on decisions regarding school, program, and college selection. Information came not only from students but also from parents, teachers, and friends. Analysis of the data led to the conclusions that family influences strongly affect achievement through their impact on student self-confidence and independence; that peer networks, or school culture, are important influences on program and college decisions; that female students have a higher self-image and better achievement records; and that gender and ethnicity are related to student independence and motivation, which in turn affect student achievement. ^

Subject Area

Educational administration

Recommended Citation

ALLOCCA, ROSE CZARNIEWICZ, "SCHOOL AND SOCIAL EFFECTS: ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT IN A SELECT STUDENT GROUP (GENDER, PERSONALITY, FAMILY/ETHNICITY)" (1985). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8508106.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8508106

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