VOCATIONAL EDUCATION FOR THE PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED (JOB MODIFICATIONS, INTEREST GROUPS)

VITO LOIACONO, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the program offerings in occupational education, for handicapped and non-handicapped students, in the New York Metropolitan Region I area, reasons for interdistrict differences in the percentage of handicapped students in vocational education among Region I districts, current labor market demands for program direction for the handicapped, and finally, purchasable job modifications available to assist the physically handicapped in the labor market.^ The sample of this study included random selection of twenty districts from the Region I (Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester counties) area. All twenty districts volunteered to participate in this study and fulfilled their commitment.^ The materials used to collect data for this study were three questionnaires which were developed and sent to each participating district via their respective superintendents. Questionnaire I was completed by the administrator responsible for special education, Questionnaire II (two separate copies) by the superintendent and board president (or designee) and Questionnaire #III by the president (or designee) of the special education parent group. All questionnaires were completed and returned.^ The major conclusions based on the findings of this research were: (1) Approximately three times as many vocational program offerings existed for non-handicapped students than did for the handicapped in Region I districts. Only 38% of the program offerings for the non-handicapped had handicapped students enrolled. Job modifications were next to non-existent in Health Related and Technology Related Training Programs (areas projected to provide significant future employment opportunities). (2) Districts with high interest group activity reported higher percentages of handicapped students enrolled in vocational programs. It would appear that interest group activity is a better predictor of which districts will have a higher percentage of handicapped children in vocational education than state or federal rules and guidelines. (3) Employment opportunities appeared to be most significant in Office Skills, Health, and Technology clusters. It would appear, therefore, that occupational programs for the handicapped should be geared towards training in these areas at this time. (4) Job (equipment) modifications can be bought for nominal costs. These modifications should have applicability to current employment opportunities which are in demand. Worksites can also be modified to better facilitate the handicapped person's entry into the world of work. ^

Subject Area

Vocational education

Recommended Citation

LOIACONO, VITO, "VOCATIONAL EDUCATION FOR THE PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED (JOB MODIFICATIONS, INTEREST GROUPS)" (1985). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8508120.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8508120

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