EFFECTS OF SELF-INTERROGATION AND MODELING STRATEGIES ON MAINTENANCE AND GENERALIZATION IN ARITHMETIC TASKS BY RETARDED CHILDREN

ROBERT J MICHAEL, Fordham University

Abstract

This study compared the effectiveness of Brown's self-interrogation strategy with and without adult modeling procedures with respect to strategy acquisition, maintenance and generalization in arithmetic tasks by children designated as educable mentally retarded.^ Eighty-four retarded children between the ages of 9 years-0 months to 12 years-11 months, representing 18 classrooms within the Mid-Hudson area of New York, were used as subjects.^ The materials consisted of two guides for the administration of two different levels of treatment and five single digit multiplication tests to determine multiplication achievement over 18 days of testing. The subjects were individually tested and all verbalization responses were tape recorded.^ The findings indicated that there were no significant differences among the multiplication achievement posttests by subjects receiving either instruction in Brown's self-interrogation strategy with or without adult modeling procedures. There was also no significant difference in posttest gain scores between the two treatment groups. Both groups showed significant gains between pretest and posttest arithmetic scores. However, there were no significant differences in the amount of the gain between the treatment groups. In other words, both treatment groups appeared to gain equally as much.^ The self-interrogation strategy was maintained by the subjects who received instruction with adult modeling procedures, but the subjects who received instruction without adult modeling procedures showed a significant decline in the ratio of strategy users to nonusers. In addition, there was no significant difference between the two treatment groups in the ratio of subjects who generalized the self-interrogation strategy.^ A major conclusion was that 9 to 12 year old educable mentally retarded children could be taught to use and maintain a self-interrogation strategy. In addition, the subjects who learned to use the self-interrogation strategy generalized the use of the strategy. It was recommended that the self-interrogation strategy could be a methodology that would improve instruction for mentally retarded children. ^

Subject Area

Special education

Recommended Citation

MICHAEL, ROBERT J, "EFFECTS OF SELF-INTERROGATION AND MODELING STRATEGIES ON MAINTENANCE AND GENERALIZATION IN ARITHMETIC TASKS BY RETARDED CHILDREN" (1985). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8508123.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8508123

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