COMPETITION, SEGREGATION, AND SUCCESSION OF MINORITIES AND WHITE WOMEN IN THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC REGION'S CENTRAL CITIES LABOR MARKET, 1960 TO 1970 (LABOR FORCE, DISCRIMINATION, ETHNICITY-SEX)

ALICE E COLON-WARREN, Fordham University

Abstract

This research seeks to clarify the labor market dynamics leading to the disproportionate allocation of Minorities and White women in the lowest paying jobs of the Middle Atlantic Region's central cities, from 1960 to 1970. Blacks, Puerto Ricans, other Hispanics, and other Foreign workers are analyzed as Minorities. Of primary concern in this study was the extent to which direct segregation and direct competition explained the discriminatory allocation of Minorities and White women in the labor market. Direct segregation is the tendency of Minorities and White women to enter already lower paid jobs. Direct competition is the tendency of Minorities and White women to undermine the earnings of the jobs they entered. In addition, the succession of Minorities and White women into each other's jobs, the quality of White male labor, employment conditions, and economic sector of jobs were considered as mediating factors affecting direct segregation and direct competition. Since discrimination could be linked to monopolization, these labor market tendencies were examined within monopoly and competitive industrial sectors. Operationally, the current research is based on an ecological analysis in which changes in the job structure were measured using a panel design and multiple regression technique. The United States Census' one in a hundred and one in a thousand Public Use Sample Tapes from State files, for 1960 and 1970, were used as data sources.^ The research provided evidence that from 1960 to 1970, the tendency of direct segregation of Minorities and White women, to fill the labor demand of low paid jobs, was predominant in the Middle Atlantic Region. Direct competition played a less important role because of tendencies to upgrade the quality of jobs held by Minorities and White women. Although there were differences in degree in some tendencies between monopoly and competitive jobs, these did not suggest qualitative differences in the labor market dynamics within the two sectors of capital concentration. ^

Subject Area

Demography

Recommended Citation

COLON-WARREN, ALICE E, "COMPETITION, SEGREGATION, AND SUCCESSION OF MINORITIES AND WHITE WOMEN IN THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC REGION'S CENTRAL CITIES LABOR MARKET, 1960 TO 1970 (LABOR FORCE, DISCRIMINATION, ETHNICITY-SEX)" (1984). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8515894.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8515894

Share

COinS