CLIENT AND NON-CLIENT RATINGS OF VERBAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS AND LIFE ADJUSTMENT (MENTAL HEALTH, COPING SKILLS)

DONALD JAMES FRANKLIN, Fordham University

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between verbal communication skills and life adjustment, and evaluated the differences between counseling clients and non-clients on these two variables using self-assessments and observer-assessments. Research on life adjustment and behavioral counseling was presented to establish a rationale for a coping skills model of counseling intervention, and to clarify the role of verbal communication skills in this approach. A Verbal Communication Skills Inventory (VCSI) and Life Adjustment Rating Scale (LARS) were developed using an item analysis of 311 subject responses to the VCSI and 79 subject responses to the LARS, to verify the reliability of the assessments produced. This analysis resulted in separate VCSI-Positive and VCSI-Negative scores.^ Correlation of VCSI and LARS self-assessments for 321 subjects, including 152 clients and 169 non-clients, found a significant positive relationship between VCSI-Positive and LARS scores for clients and non-clients, and a significant negative relationship between VCSI-Negative and LARS scores for non-clients. Analysis of 100 Rater VCSI and LARS scores found a significant positive relationship between VCSI-Positive and LARS scores, and a significant negative relationship between VCSI-Negative and LARS scores.^ Comparison of client and non-client VCSI and LARS scores found a significant difference for self-assessments and rater-assessments for all comparisons except Rater VCSI-Negative scores. Non-clients had significantly higher VCSI-Positive, LARS, Rater VCSI-Positive and Rater LARS scores. Clients had significantly higher VCSI-Negative scores.^ Analysis of self and rater assessments of VCSI and LARS scores found a significant difference between these groups on VCSI-Positive and LARS scores. No significant difference was found between self and rater assessments of VCSI-Negative scores. However, correlational analysis of self and rater VCSI and LARS scores revealed a significant positive correlation of VCSI-Positive scores for clients and non-clients, and for LARS scores for clients. No significant correlation was found between self and rater VCSI-Negative scores. Implications these findings have for a life coping skills model of counseling intervention and the development of verbal communication skills training programs were discussed. ^

Subject Area

School counseling

Recommended Citation

FRANKLIN, DONALD JAMES, "CLIENT AND NON-CLIENT RATINGS OF VERBAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS AND LIFE ADJUSTMENT (MENTAL HEALTH, COPING SKILLS)" (1985). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8600084.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8600084

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