WOMEN AND EDUCATIONAL MANAGEMENT: ACCESS TO THE PROFESSION, NEW YORK CITY BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1958-1981 (ADMINISTRATION, SEX)

LILLIAN SAMUELSON, Fordham University

Abstract

A large body of research has been devoted to the underrepresentation of women in administrative positions in education in proportion to their number. However, the literature does indicate that some women have been successful in obtaining access to upper level positions in management. In New York City, for example, although women are underrepresented in administrative positions, there are a small number of women who have acceded to positions of principal and superintendent. This study focuses on that small number of women who attained upper level administrative positions in education in New York City, and the factors that facilitated or impeded their success.^ The studies by Hennig (1970) and Hennig and Jardim (1977) provided a model for this study since their approach focused on successful women in management. Their studies noted that several factors contributed to or impeded access to upper level positions. This study sought to conceptualize factors related to socialization experiences, structural influences, and strategies. The literature, the analysis of the pilot study which was conducted as part of this research and the further analysis of the results of a closed-ended questionnaire containing 46 items as well as questions relating to demographic characteristics disclosed three related factors as critical in facilitating and hindering success.^ The Crosstabulation Program of the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (Nie, Hill, Jenkins, Steinbrenner, and Brent, 1975), was used to analyze the data. Frequency distributions were obtained for all 46 items and the demographic data in the questionnaire.^ The subjects of this study perceived themselves to have been largely unsupported in their career aspirations by their early socialization and by their familial circles. They relied on self-confidence, professional competence and sheer perseverance. In contrast to other successful women there is no evidence that they had significant support from mentors.^ They attained their upper level administrative positions at what appeared to be personal costs in terms of marriage or family. ^

Subject Area

Women's studies|Educational administration

Recommended Citation

SAMUELSON, LILLIAN, "WOMEN AND EDUCATIONAL MANAGEMENT: ACCESS TO THE PROFESSION, NEW YORK CITY BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1958-1981 (ADMINISTRATION, SEX)" (1985). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8600103.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8600103

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