THE RELATIONSHIP OF GRADE LEVEL, SEX, AND CONTEXT TO CHILDREN'S CONCEPTS OF PEER LEADERSHIP

GILDA DOROTHEA CONTE, Fordham University

Abstract

Twenty kindergarten and 19 second-grade children (18 females, 21 males) attending an integrated, predominantly middle-class suburban school served as subjects of a study to test the relationship of grade level, sex and context to children's concepts of peer leadership. Subjects were administered a sociometric, followed by a slide presentation of (a) a play and (b) a classroom situation requiring the selection of a leader. Subjects responded to a series of questions which were scored according to developmental levels of leadership conceptualization. Significant differences in leadership conceptualization of kindergarten and second-grade children were found. Significant differences were also found between scores achieved on Context A (playground) and Context B (classroom). Differences were attributed to varied experience across these two contexts. No significant effects were found due to sex. Results were discussed in terms of social-cognitive theories of Piaget, Damon, Kohlberg and Selman. ^

Subject Area

Early childhood education

Recommended Citation

CONTE, GILDA DOROTHEA, "THE RELATIONSHIP OF GRADE LEVEL, SEX, AND CONTEXT TO CHILDREN'S CONCEPTS OF PEER LEADERSHIP" (1986). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8624475.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8624475

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