SCHOOL LEADERSHIP, INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION, TEACHER SATISFACTION, AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

VICTOR A SKRAPITS, Fordham University

Abstract

The major purpose of this study was to explore the nature of the relationships which existed between principals' leadership and interpersonal communication styles and teacher satisfaction in selected effective and ineffective New York City public elementary schools. In particular, it was expected that the active cluster of communicative behaviors which involve a great deal of talking and doing on the part of the principal would be associated with the more effective leadership styles and the higher teacher satisfaction scores found in the effective schools. Conversely, the passive cluster of communication styles, the less effective leadership styles, and low teacher satisfaction would show a similar relationship in the ineffective schools.^ Data were generated from teacher and principal responses to the Reddin (1970) Educational Administrative Style Diagnosis Test and the Norton (1978) Communicator Style Measure. In addition, the teachers completed a Teacher Satisfaction Questionnaire, compiled from Smith et al. (1969) and Goldhaber's (1978) models.^ Various analyses were utilized, including two-way analysis of variance and the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient.^ The findings suggested that teachers and principals of the two types of schools have different perceptions regarding the principals' leadership and interpersonal communication styles. Statistically significant differences were found on numerous leadership styles, on the passive cluster of interpersonal communication styles, and on the teacher satisfaction dimension of superior-subordinate relations. Comparisons of the major variables demonstrated many significant correlations. However, no evidence was found to support the original premise that the more effective leadership styles and the active interpersonal communication styles were positively correlated.^ It was concluded that the effective school principals of this study, in their attempts to influence the behavior of teachers, employ different leadership styles contingent upon the situation. These administrators tended to be friendlier, more relaxed, more attentive, more open, and to have a better communicator image than the principals of the ineffective schools. It was also concluded that personal and school data had little affect upon the study's variables. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

VICTOR A SKRAPITS, "SCHOOL LEADERSHIP, INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION, TEACHER SATISFACTION, AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT" (January 1, 1986). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI8624508.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8624508

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