ELEMENTARY STUDENT-TEACHERS' AND EXPERIENCED CLASSROOM TEACHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF STUDENT CONDUCT (DISCIPLINE)

RUTH MROZEK FERGUSON, Fordham University

Abstract

The major purpose of the study was to determine and compare experienced elementary classroom teachers' and elementary student teachers' perceptions of effective management of student conduct based upon their responses to 15 classroom situations with four alternative ways of handling each situation. One alternative was based upon the research findings of Kounin (1970) or Emmer, Evertson, and Anderson (1980) presented in the Management of Student Conduct Instrument which was developed by the investigator. In addition, this investigation sought to determine whether or not there were significant differences in the means of responses of teachers and student teachers regarding the degree to which they felt that their responses to classroom situations were based upon research and the degree to which they felt a need to learn more about the management of student conduct. Further, this investigation sought to determine the rank ordering of ten factors which student teachers believed influenced their choices on how to handle the 15 classroom situations.^ The responding sample of 179 subjects included 87 experienced elementary classroom teachers and 92 elementary student teachers from New York City and urban New Jersey schools and universities.^ The major conclusions were: (1) A majority of teachers and student teachers selected as most appropriate the research-based alternatives for 14 out of 15 classroom situations. There was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of responses of teachers and student teachers on 14 out of 15 situations at the most appropriate level. (2) Both teachers and student teachers indicated that they were undecided as to whether or not their choices on how to handle the classroom situations were based upon research findings. (3) A significantly greater number of teachers indicated that they had almost no need to learn more about the management of student conduct while student teachers indicated that they were undecided. (4) A range of 45% to 87% of the student teachers ranked in the combined top three ranks the cooperating teacher, what they learned on their own from student teaching, and the college supervisor as having the most important influence on their choices on how to handle and 15 management of student conduct situations. ^

Subject Area

Teacher education

Recommended Citation

FERGUSON, RUTH MROZEK, "ELEMENTARY STUDENT-TEACHERS' AND EXPERIENCED CLASSROOM TEACHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF STUDENT CONDUCT (DISCIPLINE)" (1987). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8715797.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8715797

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