Matching teacher characteristics with supervisory styles as reflected in teacher efficacy and satisfaction

Ada Shur|Sharf Kaplan, Fordham University

Abstract

This study investigated the match between two defined teacher characteristics, abstract thought and motivation with teachers' preferred and perceived supervisory style, as reflected in teacher efficacy and satisfaction from supervision.^ Participants were 216 teachers from 12 public elementary schools in Lower Westchester County, New York. The first stage of the research explored relationships among the three components of Glickman's (1985) theory of developmental supervision. A calculated triple match composed of abstract thought, motivation, and supervisory style was created. The second stage of the research examined relationships among the match, the two teacher characteristics, teacher efficacy and satisfaction from supervision.^ The level of abstract thought was measured by The Paragraph Completion Method Questionnaire (Hunt, 1971). Preferred and perceived supervisory styles were measured by The Supervisory Approach Questionnaire (Ginkel, 1983). Efficacy was determined by Ashton and Webb's (1986) method, and satisfaction from supervision was based primarily on Fraser's (1986) study. To measure Glickman's motivation The Teacher Motivation Questionnaire was composed and its reliability was established with a pilot study.^ Findings confirmed Glickman's theory that teachers with different levels of abstract thought or motivation prefer different supervisory styles. The interaction between the two characteristics has a decisive influence on supervision preference. Teachers' perceived supervisory style had no significant relationship with Glickman's theory but intervened significantly with the match. Positive connections were found between the match and teacher efficacy; the match and satisfaction from supervision; abstract thought and motivation with teacher efficacy; efficacy and satisfaction from supervision.^ It is hoped that this research will contribute to the improvement of teacher supervision by implementing a proper match between teachers' characteristics and their preference for supervision. A good match would influence teacher efficacy and satisfaction making schools more successful. ^

Subject Area

Educational administration

Recommended Citation

Kaplan, Ada Shur|Sharf, "Matching teacher characteristics with supervisory styles as reflected in teacher efficacy and satisfaction" (1990). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI9034638.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9034638

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