Relationship of pupil mobility to the performance of New York City public elementary and junior high schools

Vincent Paul Bellafiore, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of pupil mobility to school performance in reading and mathematics. Schools with declining performance, categorized as CAR schools, were compared to all and non-CAR schools in the analysis of the data.^ An index of school mobility was calculated for each school dividing the sum of admissions and discharges for the 1988-1989 school year by the October 31, 1988 register. The influence of poverty and limited English proficiency (LEP) on the relationship of pupil mobility and school performance was investigated.^ The following statistical techniques were employed: (1) Pearson product-moment correlation analysis. (2) Partial correlation analysis. (3) Stepwise multiple regression analysis.^ The findings of this study included: (1) There was a correlation between mobility and elementary school performance in reading (r = $-$.574) and mathematics (r = $-$.534), and between mobility and junior high school performance in reading (r = $-$.640) and mathematics (r = $-$.612). (2) There was a high relationship between the combined effects of mobility, poverty, and LEP and elementary school performance in reading (multiple R =.802). (3) Mobility was the first variable to enter the stepwise multiple regression analysis of junior high school performance; poverty entered first for all and non-CAR elementary schools. (4) Analysis of the means of the indices of school mobility, poverty, and LEP showed them to be significantly higher in CAR schools.^ The recommendations of this study included: (1) Achievement test results should be disaggregated to control for pupil mobility, poverty, and LEP to provide a sound basis for evaluating school performance and staff accountability. (2) Longitudinal studies should be made to determine the academic progress of pupils remaining in the same school until graduation to provide a more realistic view of school effectiveness. (3) Schools should be linked to social service providers to better serve the needs of all children especially those in poverty. (4) Additional resources for CAR schools should be provided to insure improved performance. (5) Schools should maintain programs for mobile pupils stressing continuity of instruction and a multi-cultural curriculum. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

Bellafiore, Vincent Paul, "Relationship of pupil mobility to the performance of New York City public elementary and junior high schools" (1991). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI9123115.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9123115

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