Creative thinking abilities in sex-role stereotype women in a primarily single-sex college

Christopher Thomas Trigani, Fordham University

Abstract

The major purpose of the present study was to investigate the differences between sex-role stereotype groups on creative thinking abilities, in a primarily single-sex college. Creative thinking ability was measured by the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT), both Figural and Verbal tests. Differences between sex-role stereotype groups, in perceptions of the college environment, as measured by the College Student Experiences Questionnaire (CSEQ), were also investigated. The subjects for this study were 107 female, volunteer students, attending Georgian Court College, in Lakewood, New Jersey. The results of a MANOVA suggested that the sex-role stereotype groups did not differ significantly on the TTCT Figural test. However, significant MANOVA results were observed between the sex-role stereotype groups on the TTCT Verbal test. Post hoc univariate analysis, following the significant MANOVA for TTCT Verbal results, did not yield statistical significance. No singular dimension of creative thinking ability indicated group differences. However, it was suggested that the total creative thinking process, at least in the verbal form, cumulatively contributed to the significant sex-role stereotype group differences in the MANOVA. The results of the CSEQ, focusing on perception of the college environment, indicated highly significant differences between the sex-role stereotype groups. Post hoc testing on the CSEQ data revealed that the stereotypical feminine group reported significantly more positive perceptions of the college environment, when compared to the stereotypical masculine and undifferentiated groups. The stereotypical androgynous group reported significantly more positive perceptions of the college environment, when compared to the stereotypical masculine and undifferentiated groups. Nonsignificant results were found between the masculine and undifferentiated groups, and between the feminine and androgynous groups. The present study examined one narrow area of creative thinking abilities and identified additional areas worthy of future exploration. ^

Subject Area

Social psychology|Educational psychology|Psychology

Recommended Citation

Trigani, Christopher Thomas, "Creative thinking abilities in sex-role stereotype women in a primarily single-sex college" (1991). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI9136342.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9136342

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