Academic self -worth and accuracy of performance estimation for boys with learning disabilities and their non-handicapped peers

Joseph Richard Teta, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between academic self-worth and ability to accurately estimate personal performance on an academic, a non-academic, and a novel task in learning disabled and non-learning disabled adolescent males. Subjects were 84 males in grades seven through nine. Subjects were divided into two groups: learning disabled and those free of known learning problems.^ Subjects completed the Self-Description Questionnaire II, a measure of self-worth, and were asked to estimate their performance on three tasks: mathematics problems (academic task), nerf basketball shots (non-academic task), and the Purdue Pegboard (novel task).^ Differences were expected between learning disabled and non-learning disabled boys' abilities to estimate performance on academic tasks as compared to non-academic or novel tasks. It was predicted that learning disabled boys would have lower academic self-worth than non-learning disabled boys. Those boys with low academic self-worth were predicted to be less accurate in estimation of performance than those with high academic self-worth, regardless of the presence of a learning disability. The relationship between academic self-worth and estimation of performance on the three tasks was not expected to differ as function of the presence or absence of a learning disability; however, it was expected that the relationship between academic self-worth would be stronger for academic tasks than for non-academic or novel tasks. Attributions for performance were predicted to be different for the two groups on the academic task only.^ Results indicated that the groups differed in accuracy of estimations of performance on the academic task only. No differences in self-worth were found between the groups. No relationship was found between academic self-worth and accuracy of estimates of academic performance. No differences between the groups were found in the relationship of academic self-worth and ability to estimate performance on any of the three tasks; however, significant differences were found in the correlation of academic self-worth with the novel task when compared to the correlation of academic self-worth with the academic task. Significant differences between the groups' attributions for performance were found on both the academic and non-academic tasks. ^

Subject Area

Educational psychology|Psychology

Recommended Citation

Teta, Joseph Richard, "Academic self -worth and accuracy of performance estimation for boys with learning disabilities and their non-handicapped peers" (1993). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI9412150.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9412150

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