The relationship between perceptions of family and classroom climates and self -concept in preadolescents

Mindy Zelen, Fordham University

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between perceptions of family and classroom climates and self-concept in preadolescents.^ Subjects included 183 preadolescent fifth grade children who attended urban public elementary schools within the New York City area. Family and classroom environments are comprised of three dimensions each: the relationship dimension (i.e., expression of feelings), the personal growth dimension (i.e., self-sufficiency, achievement, intellectual-cultural interests), and the systems maintenance dimension (i.e., structure, rule-setting). The Children's Version of the Family Environment Scale and the Classroom Environment Scale measured the subjects' family and classroom environments, respectively. The Piers-Harris Self-concept Scale measured global self-concept.^ Path analysis was used to demonstrate the unidirectional causal relationships between the family and classroom environments and self-concept. It was hypothesized that the independent variables (the six dimensions of the family and classroom environments) would relate significantly to the dependent variable (self-concept). It was also expected that when both environments were combined they would account for the greatest amount of the variance in self-concept.^ The results of the path models revealed that the combination of the family environment, the classroom environment, and achievement had significant influence on subjects' self-concept. Overall, the results showed that classroom relationships were the strongest predictor of subjects' self-concept, followed by achievement and family personal growth. However, the results differed when analyzed by gender. For female subjects, family relationships were the strongest predictor of self-concept, followed by classroom systems maintenance, achievement, and family personal growth. For the male subjects, the strongest predictor of self-concept was classroom relationships, followed by achievement and family personal growth.^ The findings added support to the current literature demonstrating that family and school are not mutually exclusive, but are both influential to children's self-concept. The results reinforce the need for models of education which account for these potentially powerful family-school factors and their influence on children's self-concept. ^

Subject Area

Elementary education|Educational psychology|Developmental psychology

Recommended Citation

Zelen, Mindy, "The relationship between perceptions of family and classroom climates and self -concept in preadolescents" (1993). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI9412158.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9412158

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