Standardized-type reading tests: College students' reported perceptions and practices

Sandra Elizabeth Lanzone, Fordham University

Abstract

College students' reported perceptions and practices about standardized-type reading tests were examined in audiotaped interview responses to open-ended questions by six student volunteers (two high passers, two low passers, and two low fail) from an inner-city college. Brause's (1991) research model for hypotheses generating studies was employed for data analysis. Data reduction and data verification, two common features of Brause's guidelines for data analysis procedures, were used to categorize and generate hypotheses from the findings of the interviews. Each interview was transcribed and analyzed in depth, and provided the framework for data analysis.^ Through extensive examinations using data reduction and verification one major category emerged: Sense of Confidence/Control. This phenomenon was revealed in two major domains: students' reported expectations and strategies.^ The following hypotheses, intended to lead to theory building, evolved from the analysis of the data: (1) College students who establish a mind set that the reading passages on tests are interesting, purposeful material obtain higher scores on standardized-type reading tests than other college students. (2) College students who believe response choices on tests are frequently created to trick a reader obtain higher scores on standardized-type reading tests than other college students. (3) College students who reportedly use theoretically based effective strategies to deal with the time limits of tests obtain higher scores on standardized-type reading tests than other college students. (4) College students who report using a greater number of theoretically based effective strategies while taking standardized-type reading tests obtain higher scores than other college students. (5) College students who perceive they have some control over the outcome of the test-taking situation obtain higher scores on standardized-type reading tests than other college students. (6) College students who report confidence about taking the test obtain higher scores on standardized-type reading tests than other college students. (7) Most college students believe standardized-type reading tests do not accurately represent typical college reading assignments.^ Implications for research and teaching are also presented. ^

Subject Area

Education, Community College|Education, Tests and Measurements|Education, Reading

Recommended Citation

Sandra Elizabeth Lanzone, "Standardized-type reading tests: College students' reported perceptions and practices" (January 1, 1995). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI9543456.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9543456

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