A comparison of two models for assessing the perceived goodness of fit for ego identity and the impact of fit on adolescent adjustment

Dawn Robin Rottger, Fordham University

Abstract

This study compared two new goodness of fit models to the standard regression model examining the discrepancy between late adolescents' identity styles and processes and their perceptions of the social expectations for these styles and processes. Analyses were performed using 258 subjects, ages 17 to 25 years. The ISI3 (Berzonsky, 1992) assessed identity styles, while the EIPQ (Balistreri et al., 1995) measured identity processes. Adapting the self-discrepancy theory, the subjects indicated their perceptions of the expectations of their mothers, fathers, male and female friends for their identity styles and processes. The discrepancy between the subjects' actual identity and the perceived social demands for their identity was examined to determine the impact on psychosocial adjustment. The subjects' psychosocial adjustment was measured by the SEI (Coopersmith, 1993) for self-esteem and by the STAI (Spielberger et al., 1983) for anxiety. Though the straight line, standard regression model has shown utility in goodness of fit research, it was hypothesized that two new goodness of fit models (i.e., the U-shaped, absolute fit model whereby good fit is related to positive outcome, and the J-shaped, positive fit model whereby matching or exceeding demands is related to positive outcome) would more accurately predict psychosocial adjustment than the regression model. A model-building process was applied by selecting for model inclusion only the most significant variables. Regression analyses indicated that the absolute fit model was clearly the more useful model for predicting self-esteem. The absolute fit model and the regression model displayed equal utility for predicting anxiety. Given the advantage of parsimony, the absolute fit model was selected as the more useful model overall. Using this model, it was determined that fit with the perceived mothers' expectations was more useful than fit with the perceived fathers' expectations in predicting psychosocial adjustment, especially in regard to self-esteem. However, no support was found for the hypothesis that fit with the perceived same-sex friends' expectations would better predict psychosocial adjustment than fit with the perceived opposite-sex friends' expectations. This research suggests that family and group therapy may be useful for helping adolescents with their identity issues. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Developmental

Recommended Citation

Rottger, Dawn Robin, "A comparison of two models for assessing the perceived goodness of fit for ego identity and the impact of fit on adolescent adjustment" (1996). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI9628351.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9628351

Share

COinS